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27 June 2010

Greenish Blue

Two weeks ago, I switched to reusable water bottles for good.  I will not purchase a bottle of water.  I've also vowed not to carry plastic bags out of any store; I bring my own.  I'm looking for greener living, and here is why.  These images of plastic in the Northern Pacific, plus the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and my enjoyment of kayaking have lead me to rid my life of the conveniences that are harmful to nature.  I'm just starting.


The below photos taken by Chris Jordan from http://www.webofentertainment.com/2009/10/ocean-of-plasticin-birds-guts.html


The Plastic Problem
Conservationists estimate that 40 percent of Laysan albatross chicks die because they have been fed plastic.




Everyone's Problem
Every year, 260 million tons of plastic ends up in the ocean, (not only from coastal regions) much of it carried from inland areas by rain runoff, streams, and rivers.







Eliminating the use of plastic disposables like water bottles and shopping bags, buying products made from recycled plastic with little or no packaging, ensuring non-recyclable plastic is disposed of in secure containers, and recycling all plastic than can be.


The problem of Oil:


photos taken from 
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/06/scenes_from_the_gulf_of_mexico.html


A sea turtle in oil

A brown pelican covered in oil


A brown pelican giving up


Hermit crabs

The dispersants worry me more than the oil:

taken from http://www.propublica.org/article/bp-gulf-oil-spill-dispersants-0430

"Dispersants are mixtures of solvents, surfactants and other additives that break up the surface tension of an oil slick and make oil more soluble in water, according to a paper published by the National Academy of Sciences. They are spread over or in the water in very low concentration – a single gallon may cover several acres."
"Once they are dispersed, the tiny droplets of oil are more likely to sink or remain suspended in deep water rather than floating to the surface and collecting in a continuous slick. Dispersed oil can spread quickly in three directions instead of two and is more easily dissipated by waves and turbulence that break it up further and help many of its most toxic hydrocarbons evaporate."



My goal:  A zero waste lifestyle.

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